Three out of four of my trips to India have involved a urinary tract infection. This may seem like too much information to you, but I offer it in the spirit of public service. Women suffer from this condition more than men, so this is something I’m confident my women readers’ inquiring minds will want to know. In India, I’m firmly convinced that the lack of decent public toilet facilities in most places is a huge contributing factor.

Ladies, if you’re used to using toilet paper, bring your own. While even two-star hotels will provide it, they won’t provide much. Backpacker hovels (not a typo) won’t, and most public toilets won’t, but you can easily buy it locally. I’m just saying, don’t leave your hotel without it.

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Nirmal giving Rafiq an update on my condition.

Anyway, about the third or fourth day of my last visit, the unmistakable symptoms of a UTI rear their ugly heads. Nirmal takes me to a doctor and then to a clinic for tests. The clinic is relatively new, sparkling, very professional, and also very low cost. I’d been there the previous year. So, ladies, while you may not be able to find a decent public toilet in India in some areas, medical care will be easy to find, and it’ll be on a par with medical care in any of the wealthier nations. If you get sick, there’s nothing to worry about.

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Footbridge from the old city center (left side) to the Naga Nagri neighborhood (on the right).

Afterwards, we went to the Little Prince Restaurant for lunch. The Little Prince is on the Naga Nagri peninsula, across the lake from the old city center where the City Palace is. It’s right near the footbridge at the water’s edge.

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The Little Prince is a nice place to hang out in comfortable rattan chairs, have tea and enjoy the lake view. Some people think it’s overpriced, and it may well be. Anywhere that has a nice view, you pay¬† more.

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All I’m saying is, under no circumstances order the pizza. Worst slop I’ve ever encountered.

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